Croatia Immigration Services

Croatia Immigration Services

Obtaining a Visa for Croatia :

Planning a trip to see King’s Landing (aka Dubrovnik, Croatia) may find you in need of having to apply for a Croatia visa beforehand. Croatia is a European country located between Central and Southeast Europe and is known as one of the most visited Mediterranean tourist destinations. It receives millions of tourists every year, due to its rich cultural and historical heritage and natural beauty, but mostly because of its coastline. Croatia is a member of the European Union, and as such, the Croatian visa policy is largely similar to that of other EU member states.

                                  Several countries have reached a visa waiver agreement with Croatia, allowing their nationals to be able to visit Croatia without a visa for up to 90 days. Others, however, still have to hold a valid visa to travel to Croatia.

What’s the process to get a Croatian work visa?

To get a Croatian work and residence permit, you’ll have to apply at your local Republic of Croatia diplomatic mission. If you need to extend your work permit later, you can do so in Croatia by taking your documents to your local Police Station. This must be done at least 60 days before your visa expires. Croatia is part of the EU Blue Card network, which is a useful tool for third country nationals. If you’re offered a Blue Card, this can be issued with up to two years validity, while regular Croatian work and residence permits are limited to 12 months.

                                  The application can be done by either yourself or your employer, though you both will need to provide some documents to support it. Any documents which aren’t in Croatian will need to be translated and certified. Guidelines are available from the Croatian government website. There are some categories of work which allow you to be employed in Croatia with a ‘work registration certificate’ rather than the work and residence permit. These tend to be used for people entering Croatia in roles such as a consultant, performer, journalist or a member of a religious order. A full list of the roles covered is provided on the government website. If this applies to your role, your employer can get a work registration certificate from the police station closest to your registered office.

                                   The exact details of how your visa application is made and processed will vary depending on the local embassy procedures. Some embassies, for example, don’t have appointments, but operate on a ‘first come, first served’ basis, while others require you to make an appointment before visiting. Similarly, processing times will vary widely so make sure you have plenty of time before you intend to travel to Croatia and take up employment.

What documents do I need?

  • When you submit your application for a work and residence permit, you’ll need to include documents to support your application. The exact details may vary slightly depending on your circumstances, but you can expect the following to be required:
  • Passport copy
  • Recent passport-sized photo
  • Proof of your ability to support yourself for the duration of your stay
  • Evidence of health insurance
  • Employment contract
  • Proof of your academic qualifications and skills
  • Evidence of the company’s registration

Work and residence permits are offered under a quota system, which means that even if you fulfil the criteria, you can only be offered a work permit if the quota hasn’t already been met. However, there are some exceptions in which you might be offered a permit even if the limits have been reached for the period. In that case, you’ll be asked to provide more details to support your application, including an argued explanation of your suitability for the role and why it can’t be locally filled.

                                  Depending on the type of work you’re planning to do, it might be possible to apply for an EU Blue Card. Similar to the U.S. Green Card, this document gives you the right to work across most EU member states (excluding Denmark, Ireland and the UK). To be eligible for a Blue Card, you must be from a country outside the EU, be highly skilled (typically meaning you have completed a bachelor’s level university degree, or have five years of senior professional experience), and have a binding job offer or active work contract.

                                  The Blue Card application process is fast tracked by member states. That means it’s typically quicker than other forms of work visa application. However, it may still take up to three months. Although you start the application process online and through a single point of contact, the process may vary depending on your personal circumstances. The Blue Card network has a great website and offers applicants support to help them understand the process.

Croatian work visas for part time, fixed term and seasonal workers :

To get a visa for a short period of time, you can follow the same process as outlined above. Typically, visas are issued for the duration of the employment contract presented, so if you show your embassy a fixed term contract, they’ll issue you a shorter visa to cover the time period. You can get a Croatian visa for the purpose of seasonal working by following the same process outlined above. In this case, a visa is issued for up to six months and, after the visa expires, you won’t be able to work in Croatia again for six months.

                       If you’re from an eligible country (currently New Zealand and Canada) and under the age of 30, you might be able to get a working holiday visa for Croatia. This is issued for up to a year and doesn’t require employer sponsorship. However, numbers tend to be strictly limited and so your chances of securing a visa by this means depend on the time of year you apply.

What are the Croatia Visa Types?

The types of visas that Croatia offers to its foreign nationals depend on the duration and purpose of their stay:

i) Croatia Tourist Visa :

                                   Short-stay visas for Croatia, also known as Croatia tourist visas, are offered for tourism, medical treatment, business, or other short-term travelling purposes.

They allow the holder to stay in Croatia for a maximum duration of 90 days within a 180-day period.

Croatia short-stay visas are offered for single-, double-, or multiple-entries, which dictates the number of times you can enter, leave and re-enter Croatia.

Several non-EU countries are exempt from holding a Croatian visa for short-term purposes.

Because Croatia aims to join Schengen, its short-stay visa policy is pretty similar to that of Schengen countries.

ii) Croatia Business Visa :

                            The Croatia business visa is a short-stay visa, allowing the holder to travel for business-related purposes for up to 90 days. It does not allow you to work.

iii) Croatia long-stay visas :

Foreign nationals who want to stay in Croatia for longer than 90 days, will have to get a combination of the Croatia long-stay visa and a temporary residence permit. The most common Croatian long-stay visas are:

  • Croatia Work Visa, which allows you to live and work in Croatia. You must already have a Croatian employer before you apply for a visa as well as a work permit, which your employer has to obtain for you in Croatia. You cannot get a temporary residence permit in Croatia if you do not have a valid work permit.
  • Croatia Student Visa which is issued to foreign nationals who want to pursue their studies in a Croatian educational institution. Before you get a Croatia Student Visa, you must be enrolled in a Croatian educational institution.
  • Croatia Family Visa is for non-EU family members of Croatian citizens or legal residents who wish to join their family members in Croatia.

Croatia Visa Requirements :

  • To apply for a visa to Croatia you must compile a document file that must contain the following documents:
  • A completed and signed Croatia Visa Application Form. For minors, their parent or legal guardian has to sign.
  • Your passport or travel document. It must have at least three blank pages and be valid for at least three months from the time you intend to depart Croatia.
  • A photocopy of your passport/travel document. Include all used pages as well as all visas, present or expired.
  • Two passport-size pictures, with the following specifications:
  • Dimensions: 35mm x 45mm
  • Professionally taken in a white background
  • You must be centered in the picture, staring ahead with a neutral facial expression
  • Glasses are not recommended. If you have to wear them, they cannot cover your eyes or face. Tinted glasses are not allowed.
  • Headgear is only allowed if it’s for religious purposes. Even so, it cannot cover your face.
  • Proof of travel health insurance for the entire time you will be in Croatia. It must cover the duration of your stay and at least €30,000 for sudden illness, accidents, and repatriation.
  • Proof of accommodation in Croatia, such as a hotel reservation.
  • Copy of the return flight ticket or proof of ticket booking.
  • Alternatively, other proof you intend to leave Croatia after the duration of your stay, such as a bus/train ticket to your country or a third country.
  • Proof of sufficient funds to cover the duration of your stay in Croatia.
  • Bank statements for the past three months
  • Letter from employer, stating your salary and position
  • Any additional documents which support the purpose of your trip.

Additional Requirements for Croatia Tourist Visa :

When applying for a Croatia tourist visa, you must submit the following documents:

  • Letter of Guarantee (if you are visiting friends/family in Croatia). The letter must be certified by a Public Notary in Croatia. Your host also has to inclose proof of funds (pay slips, pension, savings) via bank statements from the past three months. They must also include a copy of their Croatian passport or residence permit, whichever is applicable.
  • If you are traveling simply for tourism purposes, the Letter of Guarantee is not required.
  • Proof of employment status.
  • If employed: Letter from your employer stating your position in the company, your salary, and the intended time you will be absent from work.
  • If self-employed: Company’s registration papers and a visa request letter which is written on a paper with the company’s official letterhead.
  • For students: Proof of enrollment in an educational institution.
  • For minors:
  • Birth certificate
  • A letter of consent from the parent/s or legal guardian/s allowing the minor to travel
  • Copies of the parent/s’ or legal guardian/s’ passports
  • Depending on the country, the following documents may also be required:
  • A cover letter, explaining your reason for travel and the details of your trip.
  • Previous passports and visas
  • Income tax returns

Additional Requirements for Business Visa :

The requirements for a Croatia business visa are:

  • Letter of Guarantee Form, filled in and signed from the Croatian legal person/legal entity inviting you to Croatia. The letter has to be authenticated with the official seal and the signature of the company’s authorized representative. Your Guarantor must also submit proof of sufficient financial funds.
  • Letter of Invitation from the company inviting you in Croatia, which states the purpose and duration of your trip.
  • Letter from your employer stating your position in the company, your salary, and the intended time you will be absent from work and that you are taking this trip for business (if applicable)
  • Cover letter, written by you which explains the purpose and duration of your trip.
  • If self-employed: Your company’s registration papers and a business visa request letter which is written on a paper with the company’s official letterhead.
  • Proof of financial funds. Either in the form of your own personal bank statements or an alternate method if someone else is funding your trip (such as your employer/the inviting company).

Additional Requirements for Croatia Work Visa

  • Proof of health insurance, such as:
  • A European Health Insurance Card
  • A certificate of health insurance issued by the Croatian Health Insurance Fund
  • A certificate of health insurance from a health insurance provider in your country, which states that you have access to healthcare in accordance to EU regulations
  • Other private/travel health insurance if your country does not have a social security contract with Croatia.
  • Copy of an existing work contract.
  • Copy of your employer’s company registration.
  • Proof that a Croatian/EU citizen could not have been better suited for the job.
  • Proof you have the required financial means to sustain yourself for the duration of your stay.
  • Proof of your educational background, qualifications, and skills.

Additional Requirements for Croatia Student Visa :

The requirements for a Croatia student visa are:

  • Proof of enrollment in a Croatian educational institution.
  • Proof of accommodation in Croatia.
  • Proof of sufficient financial means to sustain yourself while in Croatia. You must have private funds or a scholarship.
  • Proof of health insurance, such as:
  • A European Health Insurance Card
  • A certificate of health insurance issued by the Croatian Health Insurance Fund
  • A certificate of health insurance from a health insurance provider in your country, which states that you have access to healthcare in accordance to EU regulations
  • Private/travel health insurance if your country does not have a social security contract with Croatia.
  • Cover letter stating why you are applying for a Croatian student visa.
  • If the student is a minor:
  • Birth certificate
  • A letter of consent from the parent/s or legal guardian/s allowing the minor to live in Croatia for the purpose of studying
  • Copies of the parent/s’ or legal guardian/s’ passports

Foreign students who want to pursue studies in a Croatian educational institution have to apply for a Croatia student visa as well as a temporary residence permit. You can apply for both at a Croatian embassy/consulate before you travel or apply for the student visa in your country and then get the residence permit at a local police department or police station after you enter Croatia.

How Long Does it Take to Process a Croatia Visa?

It may take anywhere between fifteen days to a month or longer to process a Croatian short-stay visa. Whereas the minimum amount of time it takes to process a long-stay visa for Croatia is four weeks.

The Croatia visa processing time depends on several factors, such as the specific embassy or consulate handling your application, the time of year, and whether you have all the required documents or not.

If you have any missing or incorrect documents, the Croatian visa officers will ask you to provide them, which delays the processing time.

Additionally, some consulates or embassies may work slower than others, or it may be the time of year that has a larger number of applications.

How Long Can I Stay in Croatia With a Valid Visa?

A Croatia visa is valid for a maximum duration of 90 within a period of 180 days. When you receive your visa, you will have a predetermined amount of days you are allowed to stay in the country, duly decided by the Croatian authorities. Just because the maximum amount you can receive is 90 days, it does not mean that is necessarily how many you will get.

If you have a multiple-entry visa, the total amount of days you stay in Croatia in all entries (when added together) cannot exceed the days you were assigned when you received the visa.

If you want to stay longer than 90 days, you have to apply for a long-stay visa and a Croatian residence permit.

Can you Extend a Croatia Visa?

Technically, yes, you can extend a Croatian tourist visa but an extension is only issued if you have a serious and valid reason for it, such as,

  •  If something happened in your home country during your stay in Croatia which puts you in danger if you return.
  • Humanitarian reasons.
  • Another serious personal reason which is deemed valid.

Documents required to extend a Croatia Visa :

If you think you meet the requirements to receive a Croatia visa extension, you have to apply for one at the Croatian Ministry of Foreign Affairs before your current visa expires. You must have the following documents with you:

  • Croatia Visa Application Form.
  • A valid passport/travel document.
  • Proof of health insurance covering the duration of the visa extension.
  • Proof of sufficient means to cover your stay.

Any documents which support your Croatia visa extension request.

Whether your request is approved or not is to the discretion of the Croatian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, who review every application on a case-to-case basis.

 I have my Croatian work visa – what next ?

 Once you arrive in Croatia, if you’re a third country national, you must register your residence with the local police station within 30 days. If you don’t, your residence and work visa could be revoked. If you’re an EU citizen, you’ll still need to report to your local police authority to register your residence within three months of arriving. You’ll then be issued a residence card for Croatia. Details are available from the Ministry of the Interior.

How can I move money to Croatia from my bank account abroad?

  To get the most of your money, you’ll want to open a bank account in Croatia, which you can do before you arrive.

                  Once you send money either to or from Croatia, consider using a money conversion service like TransferWise to avoid unfair exchange rates. There’s a small transparent fee, and when your money is converted from one currency to another you’ll get the real exchange rate – the same one you can find on Google. Not only that, but TransferWise receives and sends money via local bank transfers instead of internationally, further saving you money by cutting out hefty international transfer fees.

                  If your trip is short or opening a bank account in Croatia isn’t an option, you can always withdraw money from your foreign account using an ATM there. Just keep in mind it’ll be more favourable to agree to be charged in the local currency, not your home currency. Regardless of when you start your new job abroad, it should be fairly straightforward to get yourself a visa if you follow the right steps. The most important part is just to make sure to enjoy your new adventure.

 Stay and work permit :

Stay and work permit is a unique permit that allows an Alien temporary stay and work in Croatia. The stay and work permit are issued by the competent police authority/station.

A stay and work permit are issued based on an annual quota and outside of it. A decision on the annual quota is made by the Government of the Republic of Croatia and shall be published in the Official Gazette.

A stay and work permit based on the annual quota shall be granted to Alien who meet the prerequisites for a temporary stay permit and who provide the following:

  • a contract of employment or a written confirmation that a contract of employment has been concluded or any other relevant contract,
  • proof of educational background and qualifications,
  • proof of the registration of a company, branch office, representative office, trade, association or institution in the Republic of Croatia.

Permits to stay and work outside the annual quota may be issued to:

  • Frontier workers under the condition of reciprocity,
  • Key staff, service providers, workers and members of their families whose status is regulated by the Stabilization and Association Agreement between the European Communities and their Member States and the Republic of Croatia,
  • Third-country citizens who carry out key business activities in companies, branches and representative offices,
  • Other necessary persons as defined in the Protocol on the Accession of the Republic of Croatia to the Marrakech Agreement on the Founding of the World Trade Organization,
  • A third-country citizen who is self-employed in a company in which he has a holding of at least 51% or in a craft in which he is the sole owner,
  • To a worker who carries out services on behalf of a foreign employer who has no right of establishment in a Member State of the EGP,
  • Teachers who are teaching in schools in the language and script of national minorities,
  • Professional athletes or sports workers working in the Republic of Croatia,
  • Artists working in cultural institutions in the Republic of Croatia,
  • Third country nationals who work in foreign associations registered as foreign associations in the Republic of Croatia and at least three other states,
  • Citizens of third countries who are members of the founding bodies of representative offices of foreign trusts and foundations and registered in the Register of representative offices of foreign trusts and foundations in the Republic of Croatia,
  • Third-country nationals working on the Youth Mobility Program implemented by the Republic of Croatia in cooperation with other States,
  • Scientific researchers and third-country nationals who are employed in scientific, scientific-educational, or other research positions in scientific legal entities,
  • Professors – native speakers of foreign languages, lecturers and other teachers teaching at Croatian higher education institutions or registered foreign language schools,
  • Third-country nationals working on an international contract other than the contract referred to in Article 79, paragraph 1, item 2 of the Aliens Act,
  • A person with a long-term resident in another EEA Member State,
  • Key staff, workers and members of their families whose status is regulated by the Stabilization and Association Agreement between the European Communities and their Member States and the Republic of Croatia,
  • A third-country national transferred within a company for the purpose of long-term mobility in accordance with Article 79.c of the Aliens Act,
  • Third-country nationals who come for a certain period of time to perform certain tasks in accordance with the agreements concluded by the Government of the Republic of Croatia with third countries,
  • A third-country national who is doing specialization in the Republic of Croatia in healthcare activities in accordance with special regulations.

The said categories of third-country citizens may be granted a stay and work permit outside the annual quota if they meet the criteria for temporary stay and if they provide the following:

  • a contract of employment, or a written confirmation that a contract of employment has been concluded, or any other relevant contract,
  • proof of educational background and qualifications,
  • proof of the registration of a company, branch office, representative office, trade, association or institution in the Republic of Croatia,
  • explanation on the justifiable of employment of an Alien that contains information on the alien’s professional knowledge, qualifications and work experience, and the reasons why this position cannot be assigned to a Croatian national on a labour market (apart from aliens under items 2, 4, 5, 6 and 13).

A stay and work permit may be issued to third-country citizens who are to perform key activities in a company, branch office or representative office, except for citizens of the EU, if they meet the criteria referred to above and if:

  • the value of the company’s share capital, i.e. assets of a limited partnership or a general partnership exceed the amount of HRK 100,000.00,
  • at least 3 Croatian citizens are employed in the company, branch office or representative office of a foreign company on jobs other than the procurator, member of the management board or supervisory board, and if
  • the third-country citizen’s gross salary is at least in the amount of an average gross salary paid in the Republic of Croatia in the previous year, according to the official data published by the competent statistical agency.

If there are several third-country citizens performing key activities for the same employer, except for citizens of the EU, a stay and work permit may be issued if they meet the criteria referred to above and if:

  • for each third-country citizen employed, there are at least five Croatian citizens employed on jobs other than procurator, member of the management board or member of the supervisory board,
  • the value of the company’s share capital, i.e. assets of a limited partnership or a general partnership exceed the amount of HRK 100,000.00, and
  • the third-country citizen’s gross salary is at least in the amount of an average gross salary paid in the Republic of Croatia in the previous year, according to the official data published by the competent statistical agency.

Third-country citizens who are to be self-employed in their own company or in a company in which they hold a share of more than 51%, or in their own trade, except for citizens of the EU may be issued a stay and work permit if they meet the criteria and if:

  • they have invested at least HRK 200,000.00 in the establishment of a company or trade,
  • at least 3 Croatian citizens are employed,
  • the third-country citizen’s gross salary is at least in the amount of an average gross salary paid in the Republic of Croatia, according to the latest officially published data of the competent statistical body, while a third-country national who is self-employed in his own craft must prove that the amount earned by the self-employed is at least the average monthly paid net wage in the Republic of Croatia according to the latest officially published data of the competent statistical body.
  • the company or trade does not do business at a loss,\

Work permit outside the annual quota may be granted to third-country citizens who meet the prerequisites for temporary stay and:

  • who perform key activities in a company that is a beneficiary of incentive measures in accordance with the regulation on investment incentives, or who hold an ownership share in such company of at least 51%, and the company
  • who perform jobs or carry out projects in the Republic of Croatia pursuant to international treaties on professional and technical assistance that the Republic of Croatia has concluded with the European Union, some other state or an international organisation.

1 thought on “Croatia Immigration Services”

  1. How to get, job offer letter, please get information What are the other processes after that?I can be in the security guard or in the food packing I am ready to work I’m from Nepal 🇳🇵🇳🇵🇳🇵

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