Who And Why need Portugal Visa?

Who And Why need Portugal Visa?

Portuguese immigration:

Portuguese immigration: Who needs a Portuguese visa to enter?Whether you need a visa for Portugal depends on your nationality and purpose of stay. Under Portuguese immigration policy, Nationals from the EU/EEA and Switzerland can typically enter using their identity cards. All other foreign visitors will need a passport that is valid for at least six months, plus a Portuguese visa if required. On entry, Portuguese immigration may check that you have enough finances for the duration of your stay or a return ticket (or proof you can afford one).

                             Portuguese visas are typically processed by the Portuguese embassy in your country of residence, while the Portuguese Immigration Office (Serviço de Estrangeiros e Fronteiras, SEF) is responsible for issuing Portuguese resident permits (Autorização de Residência).Portugal is a European Union member state and grants visa-free entry to all EU/EEA/Swiss citizens, as well as certain family members and relatives even if they are not from the EU themselves. EU nationals are allowed to enter the country for three months with the aim of finding a job or setting up a business. Once hired, EU nationals have the same rights as Portuguese workers.

                            Portugal is also part of the Schengen Area which is made up of 26 European countries that have removed border controls between them. Citizens of Schengen countries can travel freely between one country and another without a passport. They only need an identification document to enter Portugal.The Schengen Area countries are: Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and Liechtenstein. Four of these countries (Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway, and Switzerland) are not members of the EU but enjoy similar rights under the European Free Trade Association (EFTA). While EU/EFTA citizens have the right to freely move to Portugal, they must request a registration certificate if they stay for longer than three months. EU citizens can also request a permanent residence certificate after five years. More information is provided in our guide to Portuguese immigration policy for EU citizens.

 Portuguese immigration: Who needs a Portuguese visa to enter ?

Whether you need a visa for Portugal depends on your nationality and purpose of stay. Under Portuguese immigration policy, Nationals from the EU/EEA and Switzerland can typically enter using their identity cards. All other foreign visitors will need a passport that is valid for at least six months, plus a Portuguese visa if required. On entry, Portuguese immigration may check that you have enough finances for the duration of your stay or a return ticket (or proof you can afford one).

Portuguese visas are typically processed by the Portuguese embassy in your country of residence, while the Portuguese Immigration Office (Serviço de Estrangeiros e Fronteiras, SEF) is responsible for issuing Portuguese resident permits (Autorização de Residência).

EU/EEA/Swiss and Schengen Area citizens :

Portugal is a European Union member state and grants visa-free entry to all EU/EEA/Swiss citizens, as well as certain family members and relatives even if they are not from the EU themselves. EU nationals are allowed to enter the country for three months with the aim of finding a job or setting up a business. Once hired, EU nationals have the same rights as Portuguese workers.

Portugal is also part of the Schengen Area which is made up of 26 European countries that have removed border controls between them. Citizens of Schengen countries can travel freely between one country and another without a passport. They only need an identification document to enter Portugal. The Schengen Area countries are: Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and Liechtenstein. Four of these countries (Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway, and Switzerland) are not members of the EU but enjoy similar rights under the European Free Trade Association (EFTA).

While EU/EFTA citizens have the right to freely move to Portugal, they must request a registration certificate if they stay for longer than three months. EU citizens can also request a permanent residence certificate after five years. More information is provided in our guide to Portuguese immigration policy for EU citizens.

Non-EU citizens :

Portuguese immigration policy also includes several international agreements with non-EU countries, for example, the US, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand, which allows such nationals to enter and stay in Portugal for 90 days within a six-month period (180 days) without needing any visa for Portugal. A list of countries that require a Portuguese visa to enter Portugal can be found here.

Non-EU/EFTA nationals who wish to stay longer than three months, however, will need to apply for a long-term visa or Portuguese residency visa before arriving, which allows them to apply for a Portuguese residence permit after arrival. Those who fit into this category include those who work, the self-employed, students, those intending to live off savings, retired people and family members.

Portuguese visa requirements: Which Portuguese visa?

Portuguese visa requirements depend on the purpose of your visit and how long you intend to stay. If your nationality requires an entry visa or long-term residence permit for Portugal, you will need to apply for the relevant Portuguese visa applicable to your situation, explained below.

Schengen short-stay visa :

If you are visiting Portugal as a tourist or intend to stay for less than three months, you can apply for a Portuguese Schengen visa. The Schengen short-stay visa allows you to stay in Portugal, or anywhere in the Schengen area, for a total of 90 days out of a 180-day period.There are different types of Portuguese Schengen visa: 

Airport transit visa (Visa A) – allows transit within the international area of an airport, from one flight to another, without entering the Schengen area. This visa is mandatory for all passengers that change flights in a Schengen country airport unless they are exempt from requiring an entry Portuguese visa.

Transit and short-term stay visa (visa C) – issued for transit and short-term stays in the Schengen area. These visas are valid for a total of 90 days within a six month period, allowing one, two or multiple entries. The most common types of short-stay visas issued are the Portuguese tourist visa and the business visa.

Limited Territorial Validity (LTV) visas – a special visa that allows travel to only one Schengen state, or to certain other Schengen states if specified when applying for the visa. This type of visa may be required in emergency situations where the traveler doesn’t possess a valid travel document.

 Long-stay Portuguese visas: Temporary stay visas :

This is a Portuguese visa that allows a temporary stay for a four-month period with multiple entries. Long-stay Portuguese visas can be granted on any of the following conditions:

  • medical treatment in a health facility
  • transfer of workers between countries within the World Trade Organisation (WTO) to provide services or training
  • temporary employment or self-employment
  • to conduct scientific research or teaching in a higher education establishment
  • to pursue an amateur sports activity
  • implementation of international commitments
  • to accompany a family member for medical treatment
  • Portuguese residence visa
  • This is a Portuguese visa for a four-month period in order to request a residence permit after arrival. This can be granted for any of the following reasons:
  • employed work
  • self-employment or entrepreneurial activities
  • scientific research or teaching
  • study, student exchange, internship or voluntary service
  • higher education mobility programs (for students already residing in Portugal who want to further their studies)
  • family reunion
  • pensioners and people with income.

The Portuguese residence visa can be obtained as a Schengen National ‘Long-stay’ visa (type D) granted to individuals who will be working, studying or permanently residing in a Schengen area country for a set time. This can be issued as a multi-entry visa that allows travel to other Schengen countries, provided the holder meets certain criteria. The Working (Employment) Schengen Visa is the most common type of long-stay visa.

If you obtain any type of Portuguese residence visa, you are required to apply for a residence permit upon entering Portugal.

Portuguese visa fees :

If you require a Portuguese visa, you will need to pay a non-refundable fee. Portuguese visa fees are as follows:

  • Airport Transit Visa – €60
  • Schengen Short Stay Visa (less than 90 days) – €60
  • Temporary Stay Visa (less than 120 days) – €75
  • Long Stay Visa (more than 90 days) – €99

The Portuguese visa fee is reduced to €35 for children aged 6 to 11 years and for nationals from Georgia, Kosovo, Russia, and Ukraine.

There is no Portuguese visa fee for :

  • Children aged under six
  • Students, postgraduates and teachers who are traveling for educational or training purposes
  • Researchers of developing countries traveling for the purpose of scientific research
  • Representatives of non-profit organizations aged under 25 participating in events organized by non-profit organizations.
  • Portuguese visa fees are typically paid in the designated consulate/embassy via cash or debit/credit card.

Portuguese visa application :

Regardless of whether you are applying for a short-stay or long-stay visa, you will need to fill in a Portuguese visa application form and submit it to the Portuguese embassy or consulate in your home country. The government provides tools to help you find the closest Portuguese embassy worldwide here and here.You will need to download a Portuguese visa application form for the Schengen Area, which is available here in several languages.

You will also need to provide the following documentation along with your Portuguese visa application:

  • Two passport photos
  • Your passport and copies of your previous visas
  • A copy of your return ticket reservation (although not always required)
  • Travel insurance to cover you for the Schengen area
  • Cover letter stating the purpose of your visit and itinerary
  • Flight dates and times
  • Accommodation plans for the duration of your stay (eg. hotel reservation)
  • Proof of sufficient funds to last the duration of your stay
  • Proof of civil status (married, children, etc.)
  • Proof of economic status (employed, self-employed, student, retired, etc.)

You may also be asked to present additional documentation related to the nature of your visit. For example, if you are applying for a tourist visa you may need a copy of your schedule and proof of departure, while a student will require proof of enrolment at a Portuguese institution. If you apply for a business visa you will probably need a letter from your employer, or if you are self-employed a letter from your solicitor, accountant, bank manager, or a local chamber of commerce. You may also need references.

Portuguese visa processing time varies depending on the purpose of your visit. It can take anywhere from two weeks up to two to three months, so it is advisable to start the Portuguese visa application process with time.

Portugal Work Visas & Permits :

When you are planning an international expansion for your company, working with a global PEO can lighten your workload. At Globalization Partners, we know how to get a work visa in Portugal, and we can take care of the entire process for your employees. We can also hire employees on your behalf as the Employer of Record.

Types of Work Visas in Portugal :

Portugal is a member of the European Union (EU). Citizens of other EU member states are free to work in Portugal without a permit. They also do not need a visa, though they will need to apply for a residence card within six months of moving to Portugal for employment.

Non-EU citizens must obtain a visa from their country of origin to travel to Portugal. In Portugal, there are three types of residency visas:

Type 1: Permanent residency visa

Type 2: Resettlement visa for relatives of Portuguese citizens

Type 3: Resettlement visa for relatives of permanent, non-citizen residents of Portugal

After obtaining the relevant visa, the employee can travel to Portugal. They will have four months to convert the visa into a residence permit. An additional permit is required to work in Portugal legally.

What Are the Requirements to Obtain a Work Visa and Permit in Portugal ?

Along with a completed visa application, the following documents must be submitted for someone to obtain a visa:

  • A valid passport that has a minimum of two blank pages
  • A letter of invitation from the employer or other documentation showing the purpose of the trip
  • Proof of health insurance and accident insurance
  • A passport photo in color
  • Biometric data such as fingerprints and digital photos for facial recognition
  • Documented flight reservations
  • Proof of accommodation in Portugal, such as an address of residence or a hotel reservation

A visa will grant entrance to Portugal. There’s a separate process for obtaining a permit to work. To apply for a work permit, or Autorização de Trabalho, employees will need to provide the following documents:

  • A valid Portuguese residence visa
  • Proof of accommodation in Portugal
  • A valid passport
  • Two passport photos in color
  • Pertinent tax documents
  • Background checks for criminal record
  • An employment contract
  • Proof of registration with Social Security

The Application Process for Obtaining a Portuguese Visa and Work Permit

To obtain a visa, your employees must submit an application through their country’s Portuguese Consulate. They will need to provide the documents listed above. It may take two to three months for Portuguese officials to process the application and issue a visa. This visa will grant entrance into Portugal.

After the visa has been issued, the employee will need to apply for a work permit as well. Employees from non-EU countries will have a better chance of obtaining a work permit if they have specialized skills.

The employee or employer may submit the work permit application. Either way, it will go through the regional directorate or the Delegation of the Portuguese Immigration and Borders Service, or Serviço de Estrangeiros e Fronteiras (SEF). The documents listed above must be submitted along with the application. The processing time for a work permit may take up to 60 days.

After obtaining a visa and work permit, the employee may travel to Portugal to begin working. They’ll need to get their Residency Card from the SEF, receive a tax code from their branch of the Director-General of Taxes (Direcçaõ-Geral dos Impostos), and register with Social Security.

4 thoughts on “Who And Why need Portugal Visa?”

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *